SchoolHouse Rock!

In this page you’ll find all these songs!

A Noun is a Person, Place, or Thing

Well every person you can know
And every place that you can go
And any thing that you can show
You know they’re nouns
A noun’s a special kind of word
It’s any name you ever heard
I find it quite interesting
A noun is a person place or thing.

Oh I took a train took a train
to another state
The flora and the fauna that I saw
were really great.
When I saw some bandits chasing the train
I was wishing I was back home again.
I took a train took a train
to another state.

Well every person you can know
Like a bandit or an engineer
And every place that you can go
Like a state or a home
And any thing that you can show
Like animals and plants or a train
You know they’re nouns
You know they’re nouns.

Oh, Mrs. Jones is a lady
on Hudson Street.
She sent her dog to bark
at my brother and me.
We gave her dog a big fat bone
And now he barks at Mrs. Jones
She’s a lady who lives on Hudson Street

Well every person you can know
Mrs. Jones, a lady or a brother
And every place that you can go
Like a street or a corner
And anything that you can show
Like a dog or a bone
You know they’re nouns
You know they’re nouns.

I took a ferry to the Statue of Liberty.
My best friend was waiting there for me. (He took an early ferry).
We went for a walk on the island you know
And in the middle of summer
It started to snow.
I took a ferry to the Statue of Liberty.

Well every person you can know
Like a friend or the captain of a ship
And every place that you can go
An island or a sea
And anything that you can show
Like a statue, a ferry or snow
You know they’re nouns
You know they’re nouns.

Oh I put a dime in the drugstore
record machine.
Oldie-goldies started playing
if you know what I mean.
I heard Chubby Checker
he was doing the twist
And the Beatles and the Monkees
it goes like this.
I put a dime in the drugstore record machine.

Well every person you can know
The Beatles and the Monkees, Chubby Checker
And every place that you can go
Like a neighborhood or a store
And anything that you can show
Like a dime or a record machine
You know they’re nouns.

A noun’s a special kind of word
It’s any name you ever heard
I find it quite interesting
A noun’s a person, place or thing.
A noun is a person, place or thing.

Verb: That’s What’s Happening

I get my thing in action
Verb!
To be to sing to feel to live
Verb! That’s what’s happening!
I put my part in action
Verb!
To run to go to get to give
Verb! You’re what’s happening!
That’s where I find satisfaction
To search to find to have to hold
Verb! To be bold!
When I use my imagination
Verb!
I think I plot I plan I dream
Turning into a creation
Verb!
I make I write I dance I sing
When I feel really active
Verb!
I run I ride I swim I fly
Other times when life is easy
I rest I sleep I sit I lie
Verb! That’s what’s happening!

I can take a noun and bend it
Give me a noun
Bat ball break and plow
Make it a verb and really send it
Show me how
I don’t know my own power
Verb!
I get my thing in action
Verb!
And being
Verb!
And doing
Verb!
And saying

A verb expresses action, being or state of being
A verb makes a statement
Yeah, a verb tells it like it is.
Verb! That’s what’s happening!

I can tell you when it’s happening
Past present future tense
Tell you more about what’s happening
I can tell you who is happening
Verb you’re so intense
Every sentence has a subject
Noun person place or thing
Find that subject, where’s the action
Verb can make the subject zing
Take the subject, what is it?
What’s done to it?
What does it say?
Verb! You’re what’s happening!
I can question like,
What is it?
Verb! You’re so demanding!
I can order like,
Go get it.
Verb! You’re so commanding!
When I hit I need an object!
When I see I see the object!

I get my thing in action!
Verb! That’s what’s happening!
To work to play to live to love.

Lolly, Lolly, Lolly, Adverbs Here

Lolly Lolly Lolly get your adverbs here
Lolly Lolly Lolly got some adverbs here
Come on down to Lolly’s get the adverbs here
You’re going to need if you write or read
or even think about it.

Lolly Lolly Lolly get your adverbs here
Got a lot of Lolly jolly adverbs here
Anything you need and we can make it absolutely clear
An adverb is a word (That’s all it is, and there’s a lot of ‘em)
That modifies a verb (Sometimes a verb, sometimes)
It modifies an adjective,
Or else another adverb
And so you see that it’s positively
very very necessary.

Lolly Lolly Lolly get your adverbs here
Father, son and Lolly selling adverbs here
Got a lot of adverbs and we make it clear
So come to Lolly

(Hello, folks. This is Lolly Senior saying
we have every adverb in the book.
So come on in and look.
Hello, folks. Lolly Junior here. Suppose
your house needs painting. How are you going to
paint it? That’s where the adverb comes in.
We can also give you a special intensifier so
you can paint it very neatly or rather sloppily.
Hi. Suppose you’re going nut-gathering.
Your buddy wants to know where and when.
Use an adverb and tell him.)

Get your adverbs
Use it with an adjective it says much more
Anything described can be described some more
Anything you’d ever need is in the store
And so you choose very carefully
Every word you use.

Use it with a verb it tells us how you did
Where it happened where you’re going
Where you’ve been
Use it with another adverb at the end
And even more
How where or when, condition or reason
These questions are answered
When you use an adverb
Come and get it!

Lolly Lolly Lolly get your adverbs here
Quickly quickly quickly get your adverbs here
Slowly surely really learn your adverbs here
You’re going need ‘em if you read ‘em
if you write or talk or think about it
Lolly … Lolly … Lolly (etc during voice over).

(If it’s an adverb we have it at Lolly’s!
Bring along your old adjectives too, like slow, soft and sure.
We’ll fit them out with our -ly attachment
And make perfectly good adverbs out of them)

Get your adverbs here!
Lots of good tricks at Lolly’s so come on down!
Lolly Lolly Lolly
Adverbs deal with manner, place, time
Lolly Lolly Lolly
Condition, reason
Father Son and Lolly
Comparison, contrast
Lolly Lolly Lolly
Enrich your language with adverbs
Lolly Lolly Lolly
Besides, they’re absolutely free!
Lolly Lolly Lolly
At your service!
Indubitably!

Rufus Xavier Sarsaparilla

Now I have a friend named Rufus Xavier Sarsaparilla
and I could say that Rufus found a kangaroo
That followed Rufus home
And now tbat kangaroo belongs
To Rufus Xavier Sarsaparilla …
Whew! I could say that, but I don’t have to
Because I have pronouns I can say,
He found a kangaroo that followed him home
And now it is his
You see, he, him and his are pronouns
Replacing the noun Rufus Xavier Sarsaparilla,
A very proper noun,
And it is a pronoun replacing the noun kangaroo.
Now comma,

Now Rufus has a sister named Rafaella Gabriela Sarsaparilla
If she found a kangaroo I’d say to you
She found a kangaroo that followed her home
and now it is hers but I can’t say that
Because she found an aardvark
That fell in love with her and they’re so happy.

And my name is Albert Andreas Armadillo (No relation to the Sarsaparillas)
Because of pronouns I can say
I wish she would find a rhinoceros for me
And we’d be happy.
You see, a pronoun was made to take the place of a noun
Because saying all those nouns over and over
Can really wear you down.

Now I could tell you Rafaella Gabriela
and Rufus Xavier Sarsaparilla and
Albert Andreas Armadillo found
an aardvark, a kangaroo and a rhinoceros
And now that aardvark and that kangaroo
and that rhinoceros belong respectively to
Rafaella Gabriela Sarsaparilla
and Rufus Xavier Sarsaparilla
and Albert Andreas Armadillo
Whew! Because of pronouns I can say in this way,
We found them and they found us
And now they are ours and we’re so happy
Thank you pronouns!
A pronoun was made to take the place of a noun
Because saying all those nouns over and over
Can really wear you down.

Sometimes when we take them all on the bus
People really raise a fuss
They start shouting out pronouns at us
Like, “Who brought that rhinoceros on the bus?”
And “What made that horrible noise?”
And “Which one of them’s getting off first?”
Who what and which are special pronouns
which can ask a question in the sense
where you do not know the name of the noun.

But I know
I have mine and she has hers and he has his
You have yours
They love us and we love them
What’s ours is theirs, that’s how it is with friends.
And pronouns, you are really friends.
Cause saying all those nouns over and over
can really wear you down.

Unpack Your Adjectives

Came home from camping last spring
Saw people, places and things
We barely had arrived,
Friends asked us to describe
The people, places and every last thing.
So we unpacked our adjectives.

I unpacked “frustrating” first.
Reached in and found the word “worst.”
Then I picked “soggy” and
Next I picked “foggy” and
Then I was ready to tell them my tale.
Because I’d unpacked my adjectives.

Adjectives are words you use to really describe things
Handy words to carry around.
Days are sunny or they’re rainy
Boys are dumb or else they’re brainy
Adjectives can show you which way.

Adjectives are often used to help us compare things
To say how thin how fat how short how tall.
Girls who are tall can get taller,
Boys who are small can get smaller,
Till one is the tallest
And one is the smallest of all.

We hiked along without care.
Then we ran into a bear.
He was a hairy bear
He was a scary bear
We beat a hasty retreat from his lair
And described him with adjectives.

Next time you go on a trip
Remember this little tip
The minute you get back
They’ll ask you this and that
You can describe people, places and things
Simply unpack your adjectives.
You can do it with adjectives.
Tell them about it with adjectives.
You can shout it with adjectives.

Conjunction Junction

Conjunction Junction, what’s your function?
Hooking up words and phrases and clauses.
Conjunction Junction, how’s that function?
I’ve got three favorite cars
That get most of my job done.
Conjunction Junction, what’s their function?
I’ve got and, but, and or,
They’ll get you pretty far.

And
That’s an additive, like this and that.
But
That’s sort of the opposite,
not this but that.
And then there’s or
O-R, when you have a choice like
This or that
And, but, and or,
Get you pretty far.

Conjunction Junction, what’s your function?
Hooking up two boxcars and making them run right.
Milk and honey, bread and butter, peas and rice,
Hey that’s nice
Dirty but happy, digging and scratching,
Losing your shoe and a button or two
He’s poor but honest, sad but true,
Boo-hoo-hoo-hoo-hoo!

Conjunction Junction, what’s your function?
Hooking up two cars to one
When you say something like this - choice
Either now or later
Or no choice:
Neither now nor ever
Hey that’s clever
Eat this or that
Grow thin or fat
Never mind, I wouldn’t do that
I’m fat enough now!

Conjunction Junction, what’s your function?
Hooking up phrases and clauses that balance, like
Out of the frying pan and into the fire
He cut loose the sandbags,
but the balloon wouldn’t go any higher
Let’s go up to the mountains
Or down to the sea
You should always say “Thank you,”
Or at least say “Please.”

Conjunction Junction, what’s your function?
Hooking up words and phrases and clauses
in complex sentences like,
In the morning, when I am usually wide awake,
I love to take a walk through the gardens
and down by the lake, where I usually see a
duck and a drake, and I wonder as I walk by
what they would say if they could speak,
although I know that’s an absurd thought.

Conjunction Junction, what’s your function?
Hooking up cars and making them function.
Conjunction Junction, how’s that function?
I like tying up words and phrases and clauses.
Conjunction Junction, watch that function.
I’m going to get you there if you’re very careful.
Conjunction Junction, what’s your function?
I’m going to get you there if you’re very careful.

Interjections!

When Reginald was home with flu, uh huh,
The doctor knew just what to do
He cured the infection
With one small injection
While Reginald uttered some interjections
Hey! That smarts!
Ouch! That hurts!
Yow! That’s not fair,
Giving a guy a shot down there!
Interjections!
Show excitement or emotion
They’re generally set apart from a sentence
By an exclamation point
or by a comma when the feeling’s not as strong.

Though Geraldine played hard to get, uh huh,
Geraldo knew he’d woo her yet
He showed his affection
Despite her objections
And Geraldine hollered some interjections
Well! You’ve got some nerve!
Oh! I’ve never been so insulted in all my life!
Hey! You’re kinda cute! (Chorus)

So when you’re happy
Or sad
Or frightened
Or mad
Or excited
Or glad
An interjection starts a sentence right!

The game was tied at seven all, uh huh,
When Franklin found he had the ball
He made a connection
In the other direction
And the crowd starting shouting out interjections
Aw! You threw the wrong way!
Darn! You just lost the game!
Hurray! I’m for the other team! (Chorus)

So when you’re happy
Or sad
or frightened
or mad
or excited
or glad
An interjection starts a sentence right!

(Chorus)

Interjections!
Show excitement
or emotion!
Hallelujah
Hallelujah
Hallelujah yeah!

Spoken:
Darn, that’s the end.

No More Kings

Rockin’ and a-rollin’, splishin’ and a-splashin’
Over the horizon, what could it be?
The pilgrims sailed the sea to find
A place to call their own.
In their ship Mayflower they hoped
To find a better home.
They finally knocked on Plymouth Rock
And someone said, “We’re there,
It may not look like home,
But at this point I don’t care.”

Oh they were missing Mother England
They swore their loyalty until the very end. “Anything you say king, it’s OK king,
You know it’s kind of scary on your own.
Gonna build a new land the way we planned
Could you help us run it till it’s grown?”

They planted corn you know,
they built their houses one by one.
And bit by bit they worked
until the colonies were done.
They looked around, yeah, up and down,
and someone said, “Hurray!”
If the king could only see us now,
he would be proud of us today.
They knew that now they’d run
their own land,
But George III still vowed
he’d rule them till the end. “Anything I say, do it my way now,
Anything I say do it my way.
Don’t you get to feeling independent,
Cause I’m gonna force you to obey.

He taxed their property,
he didn’t give them any choice.
And back in England,
he didn’t give them any voice.
That’s called taxation without representation,
and it’s not fair.
But when the colonies complained,
the king said, “I don’t care.”

He even has the nerve to tax our cup of tea
To put it kindly king, we really don’t agree
We’re gonna show you how we feel,
we’re gonna dump this tea
And turn this harbor into the
biggest cup of tea in history.

They wanted no more Mother England,
They knew the time had come
for them to take command. “It’s very clear you’re being unfair, king,
no matter what you say we won’t obey.
Gonna hold a revolution now, king,
and we’re gonna run it all our way.”

With no more kings
We’re gonna elect a president
No more kings
He’s gonna do what the people want
No more kings
We’re gonna run things our way
No more kings
No one’s gonna tell us what to do
No more kings

Rockin’ and a-rollin’,
splishin’ and a-splashin’
over the horizon what could it be?
Looks like it’s going to be a free country.

The Shot Heard Round the World

Now the ride of Paul Revere
Set the nation on its ear
And the shot at Lexington
Heard round the world.
When the British fired
in the early dawn,
The War of Independence had begun.
The die was cast, the rebel flag unfurled.

And on to Concord marched the foe,
To seize the arsenal there you know,
Waking folks, searching all around
Till our militia stopped them in their tracks,
At the Old North Bridge we turned them back,
And chased those Redcoats back to Boston town.

And the shot heard round the world
Was the start of the revolution.
The minutemen were ready, on the move.
Take your powder, take your gun
Report to General Washington,
Hurry men, there’s not an hour to lose.

Now at famous Bunker Hill,
even though we lost it was quite a thrill.
The rebel Colonel Prescott
proved he was wise.
Outnumbered and low on ammunition,
as the British stormed his position,
he said, “Hold your fire till
you see the whites of their eyes.”

Though the next few years were rough,
General Washington’s men proved they were tough.
Those hungry, ragged boys would not be beat.
One night they crossed the Delaware,
surprised the Hessians in their lair,
and at Valley Forge they just
bundled up their feet.

Now the shot heard round the world
was the start of the revolution.
The minutemen were ready, on the move.
Take your blanket, take your son
Report to General Washington.
We’ve got our rights and now it’s time to prove.

Well, they showed such determination
That they won the admiration
Of countries cross the sea like France and Spain.
Who loaned the colonies ships and guns
And put the British on the run
And the Continental Army on its feet again.

And though we lost some battles too,
the Americans swore they’d see it through
Their raiding parties snuck up, hit and run
At Yorktown the British could not retreat
Bottled up by Washington and the French Fleet,
Cornwallis surrendered and finally we had won.

From the shot heard round the world,
to the end of the revolution,
The continental rabble took the day.
And the father of our country
beat the British there at Yorktown,
and brought freedom to you and me
and the U.S.A.
God bless America!
Let freedom ring!

Preamble

Hey, do you know about the U.S.A.?
Do you know about the government?
Can you tell me about the Constitution?
Hey, learn about the U.S.A.

In 1787 I’m told,
our founding fathers did agree,
to write a list of principles
for keeping people free
The U.S.A. was just starting out,
a bold, brand new country,
and so our people spelled it out,
the things that we should be.

And they put those principles down on paper,
and called it the Constitution,
and it’s been helping us run our country
ever since then.
The first part of the Constitution is called
the Preamble, and tells what those founding
fathers set out to do.

We the people, in order to form
a more perfect union,
establish justice,
ensure domestic tranquility,
provide for the common defense,
promote the general welfare and
secure the blessings of liberty
to ourselves and our posterity
do ordain and establish this Constitution,
for the United States of America.

In 1787 I’m told
Our founding fathers all sat down
And wrote a list of principles
that’s know the world around.
The U.S.A. was just starting out,
a bold, brand new country,
And so our people spelled it out,
they wanted a land of liberty.

And the Preamble goes like this: (repeat preamble).

Fireworks

Ooh! There’s gonna be fireworks
On the Fourth of July.
Red white and blue fireworks,
like diamonds in the sky.
We’re gonna shoot the entire works
on fireworks that really show
We declared our liberty 200 years ago.

In 1776 there were fireworks too
The original colonists,
you know their tempers blew.
Like Thomas Paine once wrote,
it’s only Common Sense
That if a government won’t give you
your basic rights,
You’d better get another government.

And though some people tried to fight it,
A committee was formed to write it.
Benjamin Franklin, Philip Livingston,
John Adams, Roger Sherman, Thomas Jefferson.
They got it done – the Declaration.
The Declaration of Independence, in 1776
The Continental Congress said
that we were free.
They said we had the right of life and liberty
and the pursuit of happiness.

When England heard the news,
they blew their stack.
But the colonists lit the fuse,
there’d be no turning back.
They’d had enough injustice now,
but even if it really hurts,
If you don’t give us our freedom now,
you’re gonna see some fireworks.

Now on the fourth of July they signed it,
and 56 names underlined it.
And now to honor those first 13 states,
we turn the sky into a birthday cake.
They got it done – the Declaration.
The Declaration of Independence, in 1776,
The Continental Congress said
that we were free.
They said we had the right of life and liberty
and the pursuit of happiness.

And if there’s one thing that makes me happy,
then you know that’s it’s
There’s gonna be fireworks.

I’m Just a Bill

I’m just a bill,
yes, I’m only a bill,
and I’m sitting here on Capitol Hill,
Well, it’s a long, long journey
to the Capitol City,
It’s a long, long wait
while I’m sitting in committee,
But I know I’ll be a law someday,
At least I hope and pray that I will,
But today I’m still just a bill.

I’m just a bill,
yes I’m only a bill,
and I got as far as Capitol Hill.
Well now I’m stuck in committee
and I sit here and wait
While a few key congressmen
discuss and debate
whether they should
let me be a law,
how I hope and pray that they will,
but today I am still just a bill.

I’m just a bill,
yes I’m only a bill,
and if they vote for me on Capitol Hill,
well then I’m off to the White House
Where I’ll wait in a line
with a lot of other bills
For the president to sign.
And if he signs me then I’ll be a law.
How I hope and pray that he will,
but today I am still just a bill.

(Spoken:)
Congressman: He signed you, Bill! Now you’re a law!

Elbow Room

One thing you will discover
When you get next to one another
Is everybody needs some elbow room, elbow room.
It’s nice when you’re kind of cozy
but not when you’re tangled nose to nosy
Oh everybody needs some elbow,
needs a little elbow room.

That’s how it was in the early days of the U.S.A.
The people kept coming to settle though
The east was the only place there was to go.
The presidewnt was Thomas Jefferson,
He made a deal with Napoleon,
How’d you like to sell a mile or two
or four or a hundred or a thousand?
And so in 1803 the Louisiana Territory
was sold to us without a fuss
and gave us lots of elbow room.

Oh, elbow room, elbow room
Got to, got to get us
some elbow room.
It’s the west or bust,
in God we trust,
There’s a new land out there.

Lewis and Clark volunteered to go,
Goodbye, good luck, wear your overcoat,
They prepared for good times and for bad.
They hired Sacajawea to be their guide,
She led them all across the countryside,
Reached the coast, and found the most
Elbow room we’d ever had.

The way was opened up
for folks with bravery.
There were plenty of fights
to win land rights,
but the West was meant to be.
It was Manifest Destiny.

The trappers, traders and the peddlers,
the politicians and the settlers,
They got there any way they could.
The gold rush trampled down the wilderness,
the railroads spread across from east to west,
And soon the West was opened up for good.

Now we jet from east to west,
Goodbye New York, Hello L.A.
But it took those early folks
To open up the way.
Now we’ve got a lot of room
to be growing from sea to shining sea.
Guess that we have got our elbow room, elbow room.
But if there should ever come a time
When we’re crowded up together I’m
sure we’ll find some elbow room up on the moon.

Repeat chorus.

Mother Necessity

Mother Necessity, with her good intentions,
Where would this country be without her inventions?
Oh, things were rotten in the land of cotton
Until Whitney made the cotton gin.
Now old times there will soon be forgotten,
for it did the work of a hundred men.

Mother Necessity, where would we be?

Mother Edison worked late each night,
It went well until the fading light.
Little Thomas Alva Edison said I’ll grow up to be
A great inventor and I’ll make a lamp
to help my mommy see.
Wowee! What an excellent application of electricity.

He worked hard and pulled a switch,
he was smart and very rich!

Mother Necessity, help us to see.

Now the mother of Samuel Morse
Always sent the lad out on a horse.
Take a message to Miss Peavy
on the far side of the pike,
Spread the word about the quilting bee
next Saturday night.
Little Samuel started thinking
about a way to send a message
Though he never met a horse he didn’t like.

Mother Necessity …

Elias can you help me with my sewing?
Mother dear, I’ll fulfill your fondest wishes.
Elias, How(e)?
This machine I’ve made will keep
your sewing really flowing,
In fact we’ll keep the whole nation in stitches.

Mother Necessity, where would we be?

Ring me on the Alexander Graham Bell,
Thank you Alexander for the phone.
I’d never get a date, I’d never get a job,
Unless I had a telephone.

Mother Necessity …

Orville, Wilbur, go outside this minute,
and then continue with your silly playing.
Take these plans, take those blueprints,
Take that funny looking thing,
I can’t hear a thing that Mrs. Johnson’s saying.
Orville! Wilbur!

Mother Necessity, where would we be?

When Robert Fulton made the steamboat go …
When Marconi gave us wireless radio …
When Henry Ford cranked up his first automo …
When Samuel Slater showed us how factories go …
They made this country really grow … grow … grow

With Mother Necessity, and where would we be
Without the inventions of your progeny?

Sufferin’ Till Suffrage

Now you have heard
About women’s rights
And how we’ve tried
To reach new heights
If we’re all created equal,
That’s us too.

But you will probably
not recall
That it’s not been
Too long at all
Since we even had the right
To cast a vote.

Well sure some men
bowed down and called us misses,
Let us hang the wash out,
and wash the dishes,
but when the time rolled around
to elect a president
What did they say, sisters?

They said, uh, see you later,
alligator, and don’t forget my
mashed potatoes,
Because I’m going downtown
To cast my vote for president.

But we were sufferin’,
until suffrage,
Not a woman here could vote
No matter what age
Until the 19th Amendment
Struck down that
Restrictive rule.

Now we pull down
on the lever
Cast our ballots,
And we endeavor
To improve our country,
state, county, town and school.

Those pilgrim women
Who braved the boat
Could cook the turkey
But they could not vote
Even Betsy Ross who sewed the flag
Was left behind that first election day (What a shame, sisters!)

Then Susan B. Anthony,
and Julia Howe,
Lucretia March,
they showed us how,
They carried signs
and marched in lines
Until at long last
the law was passed.

(repeat chorus)

Since 1920,
Sisters Unite!

The Great Melting Pot

My grandmother came from Russia,
a satchel on her knee,
My grandfather had his father’s cap
He brought from Italy.
They’d heard about a country
Where life might let them win
They paid the fare to America
and there they melted in.

Lovely Lady Liberty,
With her book of recipes,
and the finest one she’s got
is the great American melting pot.

You simply melt right in
It doesn’t matter what your skin
It doesn’t matter where you’re from
Or your religion, you jump right in
To the great American melting pot.

Oh what a stew,
Red white and blue.

America was the new world
And Europe was the old.
America was the land of hope,
Or so the legend told.
On steamboats by the millions,
in search of honest pay,
Those 19th-century immigrants
Sailed to reach the U.S.A.

Lovely Lady Liberty
With her book of recipes
And the finest one she’s got
Is the great American melting pot
What good ingredients,
Liberty and immigrants.

They brought their countries’ customs,
their language and their ways.
They filled the factories,
Tilled the soil,
Helped build the U.S.A.

Go on and ask your Grandma,
Hear what she has to tell,
How great to be an American
And something else as well.

Lovely Lady Liberty
With her book of recipes
And the finest one she’s got
Is the great American melting pot.